200 rally to help you save Royal Oak’s Main Art Theatre from demolition

Carrying indications looking at “Little screens make a difference” and “Conserve our gem,” a team…

Carrying indications looking at “Little screens make a difference” and “Conserve our gem,” a team of around 200  people gathered outside the house the shuttered Principal Art Theatre in downtown Royal Oak on Saturday afternoon to rally for its preservation.

The embattled nearby landmark, which very first opened its doors to filmgoers in 1941, closed permanently in June 2021 and is now at possibility of remaining demolished to make way for a new 5-tale mixed-use development.

Structured by the nonprofit  Friends of Major Art,  the rally kicked off at 2 p.m. with a bombastic overall performance by the Detroit Social gathering Marching Band, followed by speeches and phone calls to motion from organizers.

“This is about us coming together mainly because we like this local community,” explained Jason Krzysiak, president of Buddies of Major Art. “We appreciate this theater. We enjoy the memories, and we enjoy the evenings and the days that we used in this theater with cherished types and good friends.”

Jason Krzysiak, president of the Friends of Main Art group talks during the "Save the Main" rally in front of the old movie art house theater in Royal Oak on April 9, 2022.
The theater that once featured independent movies has been shut down since last June and people fear it'll be sold off to developers and turned into condos or more restaurants along Main Street.

Activists with Pals of Principal Art hope to see the assets converted into a nonprofit, community-operate theater modeled just after related ideas in Farmington and Detroit.

“Supporting community theaters in a nonprofit model is hugely sustainable,” said Krzysiak. “It delivers durability for these theaters, since they have obtain to memberships, they have fundraising drives, they have entry to grants and foundational funding.”

Go through extra: Royal Oak Most important Artwork Theatre could be torn down to make way for new development